Online Marketing Consultantabout . expertise . principals . portfolio . fees . contact . home


  Online Marketing Whitepaper
 

Online Marketing Whitepaper

Introduction

The Imperfect World of Quantifying Website Traffic

Online Advertising Lingo

Necessities for Every Company with a Website

Paid Advertising

Leveraging the True Power of the Internet

Bootstrap Marketing Online

 

A Dated Introduction to Online Marketing*

*Note: This is the original version of a whitepaper that was authored in 2001 by iCondotta's founder and principal consultant, Stephan Aarstol. It's a useful primer, but dated - pre-Wikipedia (2001), pre-Google AdWords PPC (2002), way pre-YouTube (2005), you get the picture...

CPA (Cost per Action)

CPA, also called “Cost per Action”, is an ad pricing model whereby the advertiser is charged a flat-rate cost each time a web surfer clicks on a hyperlinked ad (text or image) and performs an action specified by the advertiser. Some “Actions” typical of the CPA pricing model are: filling out a form, registering for a service, filling out a survey, or completing a purchase. An example of a CPA ad placement could be when an advertiser agrees to pay $2 per user registration action that originates from another website. Defining what constitutes that the action was “originated” on another site is decided upfront by both parties. Some CPA deals specify that the “action” has to occur immediately following the click-thru. Others specify that the “action” just has to occur sometime before the user leaves the website that they clicked-thru to. Still others designate a certain number of “return days” the action has to be completed by for the CPA fee to be owed. There can be any number of different specifications built into a CPA deal. A couple of things to note about CPA deals are that: 1) tracking can be problematic, and 2) they are almost impossible to find on any premium web real estate. See our Ad Pricing Model Comparison section to see the pros and cons of making CPA placements.

>> CPC (Cost per Click)

Authored in 2001 by Stephan Aarstol
while Director of Business Development
at AuntMinnie.com